2018 April/May/June Update:

As you know, most of the year I publish 2 to 3 articles a day.

However, every year during convention season, I take a break from that to go full swing CosPlay.

From early April 2018 to late June 2018, article posting schedule will be sporadic, while CosPlay Season and Convention events are going full swing.

During this time period, you can expect most, possible all new articles to be focused on costume making, CosPlay, and the characters I'm CosPlaying.

UPDATE: It's now divided into 7 pages. The primary page "Meet Avallach" is now over 20,000 words long. At this rate, it'll cross 60,000 long before the costume is finished, and that's not including the other 5 pages. The primary page has now crossed 60,000 89,000 words and counting, the whole set of Avallac'h pages are now more than 200,000 words long, and more then 500 pictures of Avallac'h and his friends have now been uploaded on these pages, plus there are now 400+ hour-long videos f the costume making process as we record live, every second of this insanely elaborate, over the top CosPlay project.

As of May 19, just 29 days to PortCon we are embroidering his blue coat in a countdown against the clock to finish in time for the event, while we pray that The Dazzling Razzberry will be re-weilded back together and drivable in time for PortCon, after it's recent vandalism by Old Orchard Beach's ever growing Ku Klux Klan problem.

There will still be daily updates, but the BULK of the daily updates will be limited to the pages linked here:

  1. The Avallac'h CosPlay: Who is Avallac'h?
  2. Obsession: Meet Avallac'h
  3. [NSFW] Avallac'h & His Nude Women | Witcher 3 Game Screenshots
  4. Historical Accuracy vs Avallac'h (to go live later this summer)
  5. The Avallac'h CosPlay Costume Making Vlogs (will go live AFTER finishing the costume)
  6. How To Make The Avallac'h CosPlay (will go live AFTER PortCon)
  7. How Much Did It Cost? ($800+ will run to around $3,000) Budgeting The Avallac'h CosPlay (eing written as the costume is being made, will go live after completion of the costume)
  8. Why do children CosPlay rapists & rape victims? & WHY Avallac'h is a M18+ character. 
  9. PortConMaine 2018
  10. On Being a Handicapped CosPlayer: A Look At Events of PortConMaine 2017 That Resulted In 3 Disabled CosPlayers Getting hurt at The Convention and How These Things Could Have Been Avoided


After PortCon Update:

PortCon 2018 is over... but the making of the Avallac'h CosPlay is not. It is not possible to make a costume as detailed as I'm making in fewer then 400 hours, and only 129 hours went into the simplified first run version you saw at PortCon'18. The complete version will not be seen until PortCon'19

If you want to see this costume in person and watch it's progression onward as I continue to expand it... I'll be wearing it at the monthly Maine Association of CosPlay Enthusiasts (M.A.C.E.) events, throughout 2018 and 2019, you are welcome to join us. The list of current events can be found here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/293470827423558/events/ This list is updated monthly, so be sure to check back often to find all the dates, locations, and details of events.



Is there still a market for Kindle serials?
EelKat on Kindle Self Publishing




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Is there still a market for Kindle serials?


Is there still a market for Kindle serials? from writing

Your question suggests you have no clue what a serial is, also do not know enough about books (or even movies?) in general to even know what a trilogy is, and, don't know the Fantasy genre well enough to know that 800 page books are pretty standard.

You don't know enough about writing to know to list your work by word count instead of page count, and...

I'm just sitting here wondering... have you ever even read a book before making an attempt to write one? 

The bulk of your questions are simple common knowledge things that some one who reads books on a regular basis just knows without having to ask, thus why I ask if you've ever read a book before, because it sounds like you haven't.

You asked specifically about serieals and then explained what it is you called a serial.

I can only hope you are a kid, still in school, not yet in 5th grade, and have not yet been taught in English class the basis of what books are, what there table of contents are, how to alphabetize words, and other very simple, very basis things, that are taught in 5th grade Grammar.

If not...

It tells me either you did not pay attention in class, or you had a pretty shitty curriculum in your school that thought the basics of the publishing industry no longer needed to be taught in school.

Do keep in mind that it's against Kindle ToS to publish "one chapter at a time" type serials. They WILL delete your books, your account, and block your ISPN so you can't create a new account. Amazon rules state that each volume must be a full story with a complete beginning, middle, and end.

LOTS of "serial authors" had their accounts deleted because they were dividing up a big novel and publishing it "one chapter at a time" and calling it a "serial" (which legally that's not what a serial is... a serial has to be registered with the USA government and be assigned a serial number, and must be released at minimum of a rate of 36 issues per year for 3 years in a row... in other words a magazine, a comic boom, or a newspaper.) A lot of people toss the word serial around not knowing what the word even means, which causes a lot of confusion for people who don't know the actual terminology used in the publishing industry.

That's a bit besides the point though...

Back on topic...

Over on the KDP forums, I think posted in 2015-ish, if you search around, you can find a post, where an author asked why their account got deleted, asking what was wrong with publishing a novel as a serial, one chapter at a time...

and an actual Amazon customer service employee, answered back to say:

"How often do you go to the library and take out novels, one chapter at a time?"

It was a quick, simple, answer, that really was to the point.

>>>I know that Hugh Howey made a slash by publishing the Wool series as a serial on Kindle / eBook, eventually leading to physical publication.

Hugh Howey, also is a short story writer, not a novelist. He wrote set/series of short stories set in the same universe. But try putting them together, they do not make a novel. That's quite a bit different then one long story cut into small pieces.

Please tell me you read more then short stories before writing a 800 page novel.

Novels have a specific style that is completely different from short stories.

>>Is there still a market for stuff like this?

A market for what?

Your writing comprehension is terrible. You are not being clear.

What the hell are you asking?

Still a market for what?"

Short stories like Hugh Howey wrote?

There's always a market for short stories.

Science Fiction short stories, which is what Hugh Howey wrote, and still writes, has been a huge market since the 1920s.

Science Fiction novels, not so much. You want to write Sci-Fi like Hugh howey does, short stories are the way to go.

But what the hell does Hugh Howey's series of 5,000 series of Science Fiction short stories, have to do with your 800 page Fantasy novel?

It's apples and oranges. How can you even compare the 2?

Is there are market for Fantasy short stories? A little. Not much. Most people who read Fantasy, read 300,000 word novels and aren't looking for something they can read in under an hour. Your 800 page Fantasy novel is certainly standard to it's genre and in demand, so I'm not quite sure why you want to chop it up in the first place.

But serials?

You do realize there is no such thing as a NOT print serial, right?

You have to file for a serial number from the United States Post Office, so that the US governmet can track how many serials there are,to know how many they are expected to deliver.

They also need to know if it's a daily serial like the daily newspaper, or a weekly serial, like the Sunday newspaper, or a monthly serial, like a magazine or comic book.

Harlequin novels are serials, because you pay for a subscription and you receive 1 new novel each week in the mail, currently they ship 4 to a time in one box, once per month.

You will notice in the upper corner of every Harlequin book, the series name and government issues series number, along with what volume of the series the book is.

You see this same government assigned number on every magazine and newspaper and comic book as well.

So, let's look at your question again, and ask this... how many millions of copies of each chapter of your book, do you plan to print up each week and mail out to your subscribers? The form you fill out to get assigned a serieal number asks yu that. They need to know how much of a burdan your serial is going to be on the mail delivery, so they can plan changes in the mail schedual to accomidate your many tens of thousands of issues being delivered to your subscribers. They also want to know how many weeks or years you plan to be continuing this serial. They will not assign a serial number to any publication that has fewer then 36 issues and will be delivered for fewer then 3 years, because the minimum requirement to be classified as a serieal is 36 issues or 3 years off subsricer delivers, which ever is lowest.

Is your 800 page book long enough to be divided into at minimum 36 issues and do you have enough print subscribers to mail it out to to warrant requesting a serial number be assigned to it? If not, you have written a serial.

>>I only ask because my current novel (an 800 page fantasy behemoth) would almost never get published, since I'm a 24-year-old first time author.

You are 24 years old.

Pity.

I was hoping you were 14 and had not yet been taught the basics of the book and magazine publishing industry standards which are basic things taught to every 5th grader in English Grammars classes, the same year you would also have been taught secretarial typing and Latin as well.

Either you didn't pay attention in class, or your school's curriculum was seriously lacking.

Let's move past that...

Why do you think your novel would never get published?

Have you even tried to get it published?

Are you that much of a defeatists that you don't even think it worth trying?

Your age has nothing to do with it. I published my first novel when I was 12. No publisher asks how old you are. They don't care. The only time your age gets brought up is every April when the IRS asks you to file your taxes.

And what is the deal with all these writers on Reddit doing this boo-hoo pity party of "oh poor me I'm a first time author, I'll never get published"...?

Not with that attitude. You know why? Because you are so damned convinced youve already failed, that you aren't even gonna try!

I happen to know Hugh Howey. We wrote a book together. You know that right?

Ever seen this book on my site. --->

There it is.

Oh for crying out loud, back when we did that book no one knew who Hugh Howey was. I was a struggling no body, trying to get his short stories out there.

Everybody was a first time author.

Everybody started out unpublished.

Hugh Howey wasn't born pre-published. Once upon a time, not that long ago, he was struggling to find a publisher.

The differance between him and you, is, he believed in himself and his work ad put it out there. He didn't run around going : "Oh boo-hoo-hoo, woe is me, I'm too young, I'm not published, boo-hoo-hoo."

No. You know what he did? He got off his ass and he got his work out there.

He was too busy promoting his book to have time sitting around feeling sorry for himself.

>>Chopping it into three "episodes" and releasing it on kindle seems like an appealing idea, since it's the only way the story will ever see the light of day.

As others have said on this thread... I would think your best bet is to divide your 800 page novel, into 3, then polish the beginnings and endings of each to make it into 3 separate, but continuing novels.

If it was me... I'd go the 3 volume set direction, publishing 1 every other month over a period of 6 months, then work on writing more stories to go with it to be published the following year.

>>Yeah, the Amazon book market is kinda shitty now. They really fucked a lot of people over. But never be too reliant on one seller. Sell it in as many places as possible. So that means places like SmashWords, Lulu, maybe Scribd, etc.

I highly recommend Lulu for print, especially if you want very high quality hardcover editions. I've been publishing with Lulu since 2005. They are awesome. By far the best self publishing platform for physical copies (paperback, hardcover, spiral bound, coil bound, and others.)

I did a 700 page non-fiction book with Lulu, had a hardcover and paperback edition. Quality is amazing. I prefer to use Lulu especially for printing up copies to use at conventions and book signing events.

Can't recommend Lulu for ebook sales though. Kindle or Smashwords is better for ebook editions.

The new Kindle Paperback editions are in beta right now. I don't think the general public has access to publishing Kindle paperbacks yet, but I was one of the authors invited into the beta program, so I just released a book in the Kindle paperback program... quality is VERY good. I choose the matte cover editions for it. Very nice.

And very easy to use. It's simple to convert your ebook files to paper back now. I'll be releasing 5 more novels via Kindle paperback program in the next few months.

If you can sign up for the beta program, definitely go with it. If not, be sure to check it out once it goes live for general access.

>>The book is intended to be one big novel. It has a three-act structure, but the "breaks" between acts aren't strong/satisfying enough to present them as separate books.

This is not that hard to do.

Simply separate it at each arch.

Then revise and edit each one separately on their own. Ad a new chapter at the end of 1 and 2, and the beginning of 2 and 3. Adding just enough to keep the story from being "chopped" feeling.

>>LOTR wasn't exactly standalone, and it's the obvious example of a fantasy novel that long broken into 3.


>>LotR was also published 70 years ago by a world-renown medievalist and established writer. The rules are different if you don't have that platform.


Being a researcher only gave him the advantage of writing something based off folklore on levels that drew people in because it was true to real life folklore. It had no bearings on his ability to get it published.

>>What is a "page"? Manuscripts aren't measured in pages because there's no standard size for a page. That depends on the size of the type, the size of the page, margins, etc.

>>The only relevant measurement for length of a manuscript is word count; that's what the entire industry uses.

>>You can generally assume that a page is about 250 words. So 800 pages is a 200k word manuscript.

not with Kindle... Kindle assumes 312 words per page. It's in Amazon's FAQs or ToS help guide, somewhere. They said the average trade paperback has 312 words to a page, thus why they designed the Kindle to display 312 words to a page (provided you have not adjusted your settings for larger or smaller font)

So on Kindle a 800 page book would be a 250k story.

Also, if it's a handwritten pen and paper manuscript, you can assume 150 words to a page, making a 800 page book, only 120,000 words or 384 page paperback.

When dealing with publishers... if you want to be trade published instead of self publishing... NEVER say page count, ALWAYS say word count, because end page count will be determined by layout, font size, line spacing, margins, etc, and they will change font larger or smaller to meet an end goal page count.

>>Your question is about serials. What you described above is not a serial. That's turning a single manuscript into a trilogy.

Yes.

Finally, someone who knows what you are describing is not a serial.

>>A serial is releasing a longer, novel-length story published over time in episodes. In the past, serial fiction was popular in magazines, with a new installment coming in each issue. Comic books are generally still a serialized form, where stories unfold over multiple issues.

Face palm.

No.

No.

No. No. No. No. No. No.

No.

DAMN IT!

You started out good. You made it sound like you knew what a serial was.

What the hell? Did you both go to the same incompetant school or has the entire American school system gone down the toilet?

Can't you at least get out a dictionary and look up the damned word before you make a fool of yourself even more?

For crying out loud. Doe nobody know what a serial is any more?

What is this world coming to?

>>Episodes are the length of a short story (or maybe a short novella), e.g. around 2000 words to maybe as high as 20,000 words. (Again, "pages" are irrelevant.)


OMG!

Talk about bad advice.

Did you learn NOTHING in English grammar class? This is basis grade school stuff? This isn't even high school knowledge. This is 3rd grade information on the difference between books and short stories.

What the hell are they teaching in schools these days?

On what planet is 20,000 words a novella?

Stephen King's SHORT STORY "Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption" is 49,198 words long.

That's a 50,000 word story that is TOO SHORT for a publishing house to classifiy it as a novella.

75,000 words is a novella in the publishing industry.

>>Additionally, a serial is structured different than a standard novel. You can't just break a novel up into 15,000 word chunks and expect it to succeed as a serial. Think about episodic television that's telling a season-long story arc: each episode ends with a cliffhanger or a teaser for the following episode to make the audience want to know what happens in the next episode. That is how a serial is structured.


Agree on the structure... just, not the name.

What you are describing is known as a Serialized Novel, NOT a Serial.

A serial is a completly different thing from a serialized novel. You are mixing up your words so increadiably wrong, wrong, wrong. 

Go read a damned dictionary and find out what words mean.

>>Is there still a market for serials on Kindle? That question assumes there was ever a market for serials on Kindle. Kindle is certainly a better market for serials than exists anyplace else. I think some of the SF magazines like Analog or Asimov's might still run serials, but there are very few magazine markets left for serials. But since the minimum price for anything on Amazon's Kindle is $0.99, that means that reading all the episodes of a serial is typically more expensive than a straight-up ebook, so that pretty much constrains the market to writers who are already successful and have an established audience willing to pay $0.99/week to get the next episode.


Clearly you don't often read print editions of serialized fiction. 

A 16 page story goes for around $7.99 to $12.99 from most publishers these days.

If you are selling for .99c, you are way underselling yourself.

If you are selling short fiction on Amazon, price is at $2.99.

Your Novels should never be under $4.99, $7,99 is recommended, and your short stories should never be under $2.99.

And since you mention him... Hugh Howey himself sells his 5,000 word short stories for $3.99 and his novels for $11.99 - Kindle editions - and he was doing that from the very beginning, LONG before he was famous. (I know because we were online friends from MySpace days back when he was considering the possibility of mabe writing something. I've been seeing his writing career from "the inside" for a long time. It's also how we ended up doing an anthology together back in 2013... again, before he was famous.)

People always wonder how did he become a millionair writing short stories from Kindle... it's because he charges $3.99 per 5,000 words.

People today like to say: "well he can do that because he's a big name." But they forget he was doing that BEFORE he was a big name.

>>I also might consider Kindle Select. That's the route I'm going. Exclusivity isn't my favorite route but the advantages of allowing unlimited users to read without the per part cost are big here. I'll also be putting out compilations of 6 parts for 2.99 every 6 since I feel .99 is pushing it. (My parts are mostly 5000 to 7000 words with a few in the 9000 range)

I did Select for a while. The good thing about it is you can try it out for 90 days and if you don't like it, cancel it and go without it later.

What I do is... I put my new release in Select, the day I publish it. Then for the first week, I can give away free copies to my readers, and they can read it for free on Kindle Unlimited as well. After the week is up, I tell Amazon to cancel my Select subscription. It remains there for 90 days, allowing people 90 days to try my book via Kindle Unlimited. Then after the 90 days is up, Select expires, and then I can post excerpts on my blog and website (a thing you are NOT allowed to do while in Select).

Doing it that way, my readers get free access to my new releases, but my books are not available for free for long, so they know if they want to read it free, they only have a few weeks after the release date to do so.




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