Quaraun Novel Update: Starting in 2014, in preparation for the 40th Anniversary of The Twighlight Manor Series (September 23, 1978/2018), all 2,000+ short stories are being compiled into chronological order, to be re-released as a series of 130 novels. All the original short stories are being republished both here on EelKat.com and on Amazon. In the novels, each short story now stands as a "chapter" in the novels. New scenes/stories are being writing to connect the short stories together into novel format.

Fight Scenes.
How to Write Them.

Ads by Share-a-Sale

"i'm a writer and i wanted to know how to handle my fight scenes so that they sound realistic to some degree can you give me a hand?

while my story has superheroes in it, i want to make sure that they're attack and defense and counter attacks don't completely defy the laws of physics and help would be appreciated."

Uhm, okay, you need help with a lot more than fight scenes. My first suggestion is you learn English Grammar. My second suggestion is, capitalization. You are having some serious capitalization issue here. You did not capitalize a single word, not even first words of sentences or the pronoun "I", both of which you should have learned in 1st grade at age 6.

If you didn't go to school, will guess what, neither did I. I have Autism, I was a kid in the 1970s before the equality laws ans integrated classrooms where invented, so I wasn't allowed to go to school, I wasn't even allowed to go to the special classes on the little yellow bus. No. Autism = no school period, but did that stop me from my goal of wanting to be a writer (keeping in mind by age 6 I had already published 4 books)? No, It did not. I read every book I could find on English Grammar and Composition.

At 9 years old I set myself the task of diagramming 100 sentences each and every day and I did this for 12 years. Why? Because I wanted to be a writer and I wasn't going to let some snotty nosed government tell me I wasn't allowed to go to school and learn how to write, so I taught myself.

If I can do that without having gone to school, because I was "too retarded" to go to school, than there is no reason why you or anyone else on this damn planet who wants to be a writer, should be using sloppy, lazy writing and blatantly refusing to capitalize words correctly.

A typo is one thing, but you didn't capitalize anything. NOT ONE LETTER. And that means one of too things:

1) You are too lazy to take the time to follow the rules, or go out of your way learn the rules. Which means you are not very motivated to set your feet on the path of a writing career.


2) You don't really care what I have to say. You don't think my time is worth the effort I put into answering your questions, so you don't think you have to bother formatting your question correctly. I got news for you, when ever you contact an author, editor, or publisher, and start your letter with "I'm a writer" you better make damned sure that you look like a writer, act like a writer, and talk like a writer, by making your writing as absolutely perfect as possibly, or we are going to laugh your ass into the funny farm, because there ain't no way this side of hell an author, editor, or publisher is going to believe that you are a writer if you can't even write a simple question legibly.


Until you know the rules of writing and are willing to follow them, don't say "I'm a writer", because I can see from your lack of writing know how that you are not a writer. Instead say "I want to become a writer".

If you are a regular reader of my column, than you should know that you can not use sloppy grammar in your questions to me, and expect me to not call you out on it. It really annoys me when someone claims to be a writer but they don't take the time to edit their questions. Your correspondence with authors, editors, and publishers is a very important part of establishing your credibility as a writer. You must use proper grammar when corresponding with others in the business if you want to be taken seriously.

Now don't go getting discouraged. I'm not saying this to be mean or chase you of your writing dreams. I'm saying this to give you a kick in the pants and open your eyes to the fact that if you want to be a writer, than you need to shape up and get your act together here. If you want to be taken seriously as a writer, you need to buckle down and learn the rules of English Grammar and put them to use. Because you may have the best idea, the best story, the best plot, the best characters under the sun, but none of that matters if you can't get that story done on paper properly. No matter how good your story is, if you don't know how to get it on paper correctly, you will never be published.  Okay?

O.K. Moving on. Fight scenes. How to write them.

The End?

No, you have NOT reached the end of this article! What you have reached is the end of what it currently online. The rest is coming, hopefully it'll be on here in a day or three so keep checking back. I will remove this message at the same time I put the rest of it online.

As my long time readers will already know a server crash took down most of the old free-hosted site on June 4, 2013 (which was online since 1997 and had reached 6,000+ pages). Thankfully everything was saved on a separate hard-drive and the site is being rebuilt with a new host and for the first time on it's own domain. YAY!

I am currently moving all 6,000 questions&answer articles to this site one page at a time, at a rate of about 4 to 7 new pages being added each day, so be patient. Not all links are yet clickable. This process started on September 2, 2013 and will be ongoing at least through to January 2014. (And it may be well into 2017 before all 6,000 pages will be back online if I continue at this rate of 5 a day.)

Ads by Google