EelKat Wendy C Allen - Dark Fantasy Author



EXTREME SPOILER WARNING!

Please be aware that nearly every page on this website contains spoilers to something. I talk about a lot of fandoms, and go into great detail analyzing them when I do. If I am talking about The Witcher series, InuYasha, Disney Ducks, the Quaraun series, or any other fandom, you WILL encounter spoilers about it. 

The 100 Page Myth To Getting Google Traffic...

VS

The power of being a screaming fangirl.

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Hi, Is this sbi rumor true to gain traffic to your website ?
Hi, every now and then I'll see in the sbi forums multiple people say that when their site reached a certain amount of pages such as 100 to 300 pages is when they started getting a decent amount of traffic to their website is this rumor true?

I understand that a lot more has to do with getting traffic but It seems like I'm getting the same amount of traffic no matter how many pages I write! :roll:

I noticed a traffic growth spurt in the beginning of my site at around 25 to 40 pages and then after adding 50 more pages to my site, my traffic today hasn't changed at all.

I'm at 90 pages right now and am wondering hmmmm maybe 10 more pages at 100 pages I will start to see at least a bit more traffic???

So I'm wondering if anyone noticed any growth in traffic after your site has made a certain amount of written pages? Or is this rumor false?
..................

All images on this page are from:
The Witcher 3: 
Wild Hunt 
|Game of the Year Edition| 
Completionist Run: 
The Avallac'h Playthrough
(Watch It Live HERE)





..................

Hi, Is this sbi rumor true to gain traffic to your website ? 
Hi, every now and then I'll see in the sbi forums multiple people say that when their site reached a certain amount of pages such as 100 to 300 pages is when they started getting a decent amount of traffic to their website is this rumor true?

I understand that a lot more has to do with getting traffic but It seems like I'm getting the same amount of traffic no matter how many pages I write! :roll:

I noticed a traffic growth spurt in the beginning of my site at around 25 to 40 pages and then after adding 50 more pages to my site, my traffic today hasn't changed at all.

I'm at 90 pages right now and am wondering hmmmm maybe 10 more pages at 100 pages I will start to see at least a bit more traffic???

So I'm wondering if anyone noticed any growth in traffic after your site has made a certain amount of written pages? Or is this rumor false?
..................




The 100 Page Myth To Getting Google Traffic...

VS

The power of being a screaming fangirl.


I would say it is true to a certain extent, and even then it would only be completely true for certain niches.

For example, so websites may only need a dozen or so pages, because, maybe their focus is on a local service.

Say they are a small business... for example, they make glass items and offer glass blowing lessons.

How many pages do they need? Likely not many. A page linking to their Etsy shop. An About Us page. A FAQs page. A form page where people can sign up to take classes. Maybe 10 or so articles on the glass blowing process and the history of glass blowing?

They don't need many pages because their focus in on showcasing their offline business and online Etsy shop.

Their focus is their online shop and offline classes, so they rely more heavily on Google searches such as "glass art for sale" or "glass blowing classes in my area". Their focus is not on making lots of articles, so they will find other ways to drive traffic. Because this is an offline store they will rely more on offline things like business cards, booths at local festivals, etc, and people searching for local businesses, and less on global search traffic.


But then, that same topic, glass art, could be used by a different website in a completely different way. Maybe the web creator is someone who loves collecting blown glass art pieces.

They don't make blown glass, but they are obsessed with collecting it and researching the history of it.

So they write an article a week, or even one a day, and they upload photos of their collection and then link the images to Pinterest.

This website becomes very "blog-like" because of the weekly/daily articles, and so this site is going to be relying more heavily on Google search traffic. 

At first, it probably won't gain much traffic, because it'll be seen as a fangirl fangirling her collection of glass animals, but after a few years (and therefore 150 to 300+ pages of articles) it'll start to be seen as more of an authority site and a go-to place to find out info on glass art.

And so, the number of pages in and of itself does not cause more traffic, so much as the reputation of the creator who is now seen as an authority in the topic, based on how many years she was writing about it.


So my thought on it is more: time (age of website) contributes to increase of traffic, more than the amount of pages.

But, it can appear that amount of pages is the cause because an older site is more likely to have more pages, simply because many creators are prone to add new pages at least monthly, often weekly, sometimes daily.

So an old site ends up having 100s, or even thousands, or as in the case of my site 10s of thousands (I started it in 1996, moved it to WordPress in 2003, and moved it to SBI in 2013, and have added pages near daily that whole time).

Of course, there also comes a point where you get a lot of traffic just because you have a lot of pages. For example, in theory, a site with 10,000 pages is going to get 10,000 views a day even if each page only gets 1 view a day. But if it has 100+ popular pages, that adds even more. And yeah, at that point it does become a numbers thing where you are getting high traffic, just because of high page amounts. However, a site with 10,000 pages, could have 9,000 pages that got 2 or 3 or more months between getting a single view. So in reality, the theory of lots of pages may not work and a site with 10,000 pages may still only get 100 views a month.

Topic determines views more then anything else.

If the topic is popular today, it'll get hundreds of views a day, even if you only have 3 pages on your site. 

If the topic is too obscure, it could go months between any page getting a view, even with hundreds of pages on the site.

Topic alone is not always going to do it. Trends fluctuate and what is a hot topic today could be an outdated fad tomorrow. The obscure unheard of topic today, could be the next big hit a year from now. Meaning not only does your topic play a role in your traffic results, but so to does timing (trends and fads) play a role as well.

So, you won't always see consistent steady traffic. Pages that got 100 views a day last year, may get 1,000 views a day next year or they may get only 10 views a month next year. While a page that is dead and hasn't gotten any views for a couple of years, may suddenly get thousands of views tomorrow.

The topic and TIMING has a lot to do with it. 


For example, my site is an author homepage and I am the topic, so the site focuses not only on my novels and my characters and teaching new writers how to create worlds and characters and edit manuscripts and get it all published, but it also is an outlet for me to reach out to my fans and share my interests and hobbies. 

I've been a major Witcher fan for years, I write a lot of articles about the games, the novels, the characters. I've made more than 4,000 mods for the game, live stream a massively rewritten version of the game, with all-new characters and quests and maps, have more than a dozen world records in the game, have been CosPlaying one character at conventions for nearly a decade.

Several years ago, I did a playthrough of the game, playing as NUDE Ciri. Back in 2016 (4 years ago) I made a page on my site called "Nude Pictures of Ciri From Witcher 3". It was a largely ignored page that got 100 or so views per month. At the time, hardly anyone knew anything about the Witcher, so no one searched for The Witcher, thus no one ended up on that page.

The Witcher series makes up a large portion of my website with about 700 of the pages devoted just to researching the romance between Ciri and one of her many lovers, the elven mage Avallac'h. She had a new sex partner just about every chapter of the 4,000 pages 8 novel series, but my focus was just on this one lover out of her 80+ lovers. He was not a popular character, has almost no fans (besides me) so no one cared, and for the past 4 years, my weekly articles about him, have been the lowest viewed pages on my site.



The end result is, I have more than 15,000 images of Ciri nude, only around 200 of them are uploaded to my website. And they have been there, not getting any traffic for 3 years.

Last summer, Netflix decided to make a TV show based off the novels. It got hyped up a lot, and traffic to my long dead Witcher topic pages started to increase.

As the release date got closer, traffic increased.

October 2019, just before the release of the TV show December 2019... I got 21,000 visits to one single page on my website: the nude Ciri pictures page, which had spent 3 years rarely getting 100 views a month.

Throughout November 2019 that one page averaged 2,000 views a day.

The TV show aired on December 22, 2019.

December 23, 2019, the very next day after the airing of the TV show, that page that had been dead for years page got 300,000+ views in a single day.

300,000 views on 1 page in 1 day.

Which page was it? Here, let me give you a link....

THIS PAGE got 300,000 views in ONE SINGLE DAY.

While there are 700+ pages on the topic of The Witcher series on my website (I've been writing fangirl love about the series since 2007), most of them focus on a character who is very minor, is not in the TV show, likely never will be in the TV show, but was the lover of main character Ciri (the main character of the novels;

Geralt is the main character in the TV show and games, even though Ciri was the main character in the novels).... so only pages mentioning Ciri were getting traffic, but that one page got an insane amount of traffic.

In this situation, I had a topic that was so obscure (Ciri's elven mage lover, Avallac'h) that I literally had the ONLY WEB SITE ON THE PLANET about him.

At the time, he wasn't even on Wikipedia and even the official Witch Wiki did not have a page about him.

Thing is, I'm an uber-fan of something that a year ago almost no one ever heard of, but me, I've been gushing love for it on my website for close to 20 years...

so, when more people started to hear about it and look for it...

I literally had the ONLY WEBSITE ABOUT IT...

now a few months have gone by and more Witcher sites are showing up, but Google is pushing my site to #1 page 1 of more than 3,000 Witcher related search terms right now, and it's the age of my site and the number of pages on my site combined causing it.

The new sites can not get my traffic results, because, it took me nearly 20 years to write all those pages, and they've only had a few weeks to get started since the TV show came out.

Meaning I did what SBI preaches: cornered the market on a tiny niche, and stuck with it until the day it became popular.

In 2013, no one had ever heard of The Witcher series.

Only a few geeks and nerds like myself knew what it was.

It was kind of a stupid, high-risk thing to write web pages about because no one was searching for it. But, mega-fan that I am, I just gushed fangirl love for it anyway, even though I had no chance in hell of any of those pages getting more than 1 or 2 views a month.

I took my passion and wrote about it anyway, and now, nearly 20 years later, it's suddenly popular and one of those dead pages about a topic no one cared about 20 years ago, got 300,000 views in a single day, the day after the release of the TV show.

And so, the lesson here is that having a lot of pages, may help you out, but it may not, depending on the topic.

Those Witcher pages of mine were just dead. Most of them went months between getting a view. I wrote them because I loved the topic, even though I knew no one else cared about the topic so they were never going to get traffic. 

A year ago, if you had told me those long dead pages would suddenly become my most viewed pages of all time, I would have laughed.

I never would have imagined a page that went months between a view would suddenly be getting thousands of views a day, but I never would have predicted those obscure self-published Polish language, with no English translation, novels would be made into a TV show either.

SBI always tells us Passion and Niche are the keys to success.

Run with your passion. Pick a niche no one else has. Equals corner the market.

Having lots of pages helps, sure... but small niche is king and being the ONLY WEBSITE about your topic, means Google has no choice but to send ALL the traffic to you.

Think about it... there are millions of travel sites, millions of diet sites, so, Google has to filter the traffic. If 1 million people search and there are 1 million sites on the topic, chances are, all 1 million sites are each going to get only 1 view.

But when you have the ONLY website on your topic, ALL the traffic goes to you and you alone, like what just happened last December to me. Millions of people found out about the Witcher, a series that has been around for more 40 years, and was so obscure, so unheard of, that I had the ONLY website about it.

So when people watched the show and then ran to Google looking for more info on the novels the show was based on, where did Google send those people? To the ONLY website out there: mine. Google literally had NO PLACE ELSE to send anyone.

Can that be repeated? Yes and no. You need to be a raging, uber fan of something very obscure, and spend years writing pages about it with little to no traffic, and hope someday, maybe it will become popular.




But... but... Lord Sesshomaru and Scrooge....
where are they?

The evolution of Lord Sesshomaru's appearance over the years left to right: Live Action Movie 2013, Cartoon 1999, Comic Book 1991; Mongolian actor Jiang Yi played Lord Sesshomaru in the now banned 32 hour long live action movie. The movie was filmed without Rumiko Takahashi's knowledge or permission and was pulled from theaters days after it aired, due to a copyright infringement lawsuit. Bootleg DVD copies of the incredibly rare InuYasha live action movie go for $3,000+ on eBay.
Characters left to right: Kikio, Kagome, InuYasha, Lord Sesshomaru, Rin, as they appeared in the live-action movie
Lord Sesshomaru and Rin as they appeared in the cartoon
Not only do I have all 558 volumes of the comic book, I also have all the DVDs of the TV show, the animated movies, and all the VIZ yellow back reprints, and all the VIZ Big reprints... I am missing only one item of the InuYasha series: the now banned 32 hour long Mongolian live action movie featuring Jiang Yi as Wu Dao/Lord Sesshomaru

For people who knew me from Squidoo and arrive here to see Avallac'h everywhere, then ask me: "*But what about Lord Sesshomaru?"*... I direct you to the 4 foot tall stack of DVDs that you can see just to the right of me in this photo.

You will be happy to know that my Lord Sesshomaru obsession is alive and well and when I am not obsessively playing Witcher 3 here on Twitch to obsess very obsessively over Avallac'h, I am watching InuYasha DVDs on my computer to obsessively obsess over Lord Sesshomaru.

And for people who know me from way, way, way back at The SoapBox Forum.... yes, my incredibly disturbing and unhealthy Uncle Scrooge obsession is still as disturbingly unhealthy a raging obsession as it ever was... and I am now in 2nd place for the Guiness World Record of the largest Uncle Scrooge collection on the planet.

Also July 18, 2020 marks the 15th anniversary of my Scrooge McDuck Thread on The SoapBox and, surprisingly.... on a forum that deletes threads after 6 months, my Scrooge thread is still stickied by the mods to the top of the website, has tens of thousands of posts and is still alive and well after 15 years, making it one of the longest running forum threads in internet history, and has received several dozen awards from eBay staff for being the single most informative thread on Disneiania, Uncle Scrooge, Donald Duck, and Golden Age comic book history. It is referenced by I.N.D.U.C.K.S., Wikipedia, and even Disney themselves. And that forum thread is how I came to meet Don Rosa and Alan Young, with Alan Young *(voice actor of Scrooge McDuck in DuckTales)* going on to be my best friend for well over a decade.

Alan Young, voice actor of Scrooge McDuck... seen here with Mr. Ed

When Alan Young died, his daughter contacted me to say that her father was very lonely, had no friends, and thought his voice acting career long forgotten, until he met me.

She said my friendship with him, though my obsession with Scrooge McDuck revived his will to live in the last decade of his life. He was the voice of Scrooge McDuck since 1943. Yes, all the way back to the very first Scrooge cartoon *"The Spirit of '43"*.

He was 97 years old when he died and before encountering me, thought he'd been forgotten. Alan Young was the dearest friend I ever had and his death was heartbreaking for me.

And for those who remember my relationship with Alan Young and asked about Don Rosa, David Kaye, and Mike Maloney...

Don Rosa is fascinated and perplexed and a regular penpal. Sadly, Don Rosa is currently in very poor health and has retired from his work with Disney.

David Kaye is deeply disturbed.

And Mike Maloney found me on his own, without my having to seek him out, he finds it fascinating and watches my Twitch streams.

All 4 of them had the same response to discovering me: that I am most definitely the biggest and most obsessed fan each of them has.


And since it gets asked frequently and I'm on the topic right now...

People often ask, if I get obsessed over actors, singers, authors, etc, the was I do fictional characters.

No.

I don't.

For one thing, I do draw a huge line between fictional characters and real people.

Being a famous celebrity myself, I know what it's like to deal with fans who can not tell the difference between you as a person and the characters you play.

For a recent example most gamers will know about is Laura vs Abbey.

If you are a gamer, then you know immediately, what Laura vs Abbey means.

For those not gamers... a very popular video game, released a sequel, and took a very bold move of killing the main character from the first game, brutally, violently, and then forcing the gamer to play the game, as the murderer, in order to re-tell the story of the first, through the eyes of the villain.

It's gone down in gaming history as the ballsiest move any game team has ever done.

And the voice actor behind the villain, has suffered dearly for it.

Abbey is the villain. 

Laura is the voice actor of the villain.

Within hours of the game's release, Laura, the real person, started receiving death threats, addressing her as Abby, the fictional character. People arrived at her house. Attacked her family. She's shut down most of social medias. 

She's one of the biggest voice actors out there. She's done hundreds of voices for hundreds of characters.

Google it. Look uo Laura vs Abbey, and see what fans of the first game's main character did, to the voice actor of the villain.

It's terrible.

But that sort of thing is the WHY, behind why you never see me get obsessed with actors, voice actors, movie actors, tv actors.

The actor is NOT the character. 

The actor is a real person. Real people have families, feelings, emotions. And fans, as a general rules, are pretty scary.

Fictional characters, it's more or less "safe" to be obsessed with. But real people, it's NEVER safe to be obsessed with.

Fictional characters, don't get hurt by things you say, things you do.

Real people, can be hurt by things you say, things you do.

Fanfiction about a fictional character, isn't going to hurt the character's reputation. Because the fictional character IS NOT REAL.

Fanfiction about a real person, IS going to hurt the person's reputation. It could destroy their marriage, cost them their careers, or even drive them to suicide. 

Actors are real people, real lives, real emotions, real families, real jobs, and any time you do or say anything about them, you could potentially hurt them, even if you didn't mean to. You could potentially start damaging gossip and rumors about them, and I NEVER write about the actors behind the characters for that reason.

I know when and where to draw the line.

But the fact is, most people look at my so-called "obsessions" and miss the mark completely, when it comes to WHY I write so much about these characters.

And in fact, I'm not as obsessed with fictional characters, as things like my Twitch profile would make it seem.

You must remember, I am a content marketer, and my "obsessions" with Avallac'h, Lord Sesshomaru, and Scrooge McDuck are lot more controlled, planned out, and staged then you would imagine.

My primary source of income is writing how-to articles for fan-based markets.

Keep in mind too, that I own some of the largest websites on the internet. I have 30million+ subscribers on my largest website.

Everything you read here on my profile is just rough drafts of articles that will be polished up, edited, and published on one of my websites. That's why these panels on my profile change daily, and why the articles in the panels will disappear after a week or a month.

They may be gone from my profile, but they are not gone from the internet.

I put the drafts here, because my Twitch profile rarely gets more then 100 views per week, and it's mostly young kids in their 20s and 30s viewing, most of them incapable of knowing a misspelled word or bad grammar when they see it.

Once the articles are edited, polished, and ready for publishing, they get moved to one of my 200+ websites, one of my 24+ blogs, or one of my 12+ forums, and are removed from my Twitch profile.

If it lands on one of my biggest websites, it could get over a million readers/views per day.

I'm one of Google's top 10 highest paid content marketers for a reason.

I know how to find a niche, that will guarantee I rank #1, page 1, of every search term for it.

The key, is cornering the market.

So while the majority of content writers, target POPULAR niches like dieting, I go for the obscure niches.

Think about it... there are millions of travel sites, millions of diet sites, so, Google has to filter the traffic. If 1 million people search and there are 1 million sites on the topic, chances are, all 1 million sites are each going to get only 1 view.

But when you have the ONLY website on your topic, ALL the traffic goes to you and you alone, like what just happened last December to me. Millions of people found out about the Witcher, a series that has been around for more 40 years, and was so obscure, so unheard of, that I had the ONLY website about it.

So when people watched the show and then ran to Google looking for more info on the novels the show was based on, where did Google send those people? To the ONLY website out there: mine. Google literally had NO PLACE ELSE to send anyone.

Passion and Niche are the keys to success.

I take something that I like and I hone in on it, analyze every nook and cranny, capture all the details, and write an article on every one of those details.

So, when you look at my obsession with fictional characters, and ask, why I don't do the same thing with real people... you aren't looking at the whole picture, or the bank account behind the "obsession".

People who know me offline, see a huge difference than what you see online, when comes to the obsessions.

Offline, you'll never hear me talk about Scrooge, Sesshomaru, or Avallac'h. Not at all. You'll hear me talk about my family, my cars, my cats, my dog, my hamster, my fish, but you'll never once hear me mention comic books, video games, cartoons, Scrooge, Sesshomaru, or Avallac'h, because they really are not that big of a part of my offline life at all.

Cooking. Baking from scratch. Pasta casseroles. Rice casseroles. Stir fries. Food trucks and Gordon Ramsay... that's what you'll hear me talk about offline. Gordon Ramsay is one of my favorite people. If I was going to get obsessed with someone, it'd be Gordon Ramsay. In fact, all of my favorite people are celebrity chefs. I'm obsessed with cooking. And yet, online, you never hear me talk about those things at all. 

Why? 

No money in it.

It's insanely difficult to make money online in the recipe, cooking, celebrity chef niche because it's so very over saturated.

If I'm online writing lots of articles "very obsessively" it's because that topic can get my #1, page 1 Google rankings in 1,000 or more keywords.

My income comes from Google Ads, Amazon affiliate, Kindle Book sales, and my biggest money maker: my Zazzle art sales.

Heck... look at the badge beside my username of Zazzle... I'm one of top 100 highest paid professional artists on Zazzle. That's what that badge means.

Yeah, I'm an artist. My paintings have been in art galleries, and even museums. I get hired to paint canvas art for conventions.

Being a professional artist full time, is not easy.

It's next to impossible to drive traffic to an art website. Most artists will make less money from their art, in their entire lifetime of selling art, then I make in one week from selling my art.

Why am I different?

It's not my art. It's not that I paint better landscapes then the next artist. No. It's my marketing skills.

Look at my websites. What do you see? Thousands of articles about Scrooge, Sesshomaru, Avallac'h... yes... but look at the side bar. What are the ADs? That's the key. The side bar has Google ads, links to the Witcher games & novels on Amazon, the InuYasha DVDs and books on Amazon, Uncle Scrooge comic books on Amazon, my novels on Kindle, and my art on Zazzle.